Spring Cleaning Time!

I searched online for Spring Cleaning Tips and found a post by Karen Rowe you can read here.

Karen’s tips could easily be adapted for writers. So, here are 10 to help you:

brainstorm.The next week, rescue your protag. Then edit.

8. Make Time

Finding time to write can be tough. Pick a time that works for you—and stick to it. If you use a day planner or online calendar, schedule your writing time. Treat it like work; that’s what it is. (This writer’s clock may keep you on track.)

7. Start Somewhere

Frustration mounts when what you’re working on is not working. So write your ending instead. If you don’t know the end, skip to the next chapter and move the story forward from there. Or polish what you have written. Just start. (Need an impartial review?)

6. Baby Steps

Key writing tasks include brainstorming, researching, spewing (first draft), polishing, editing, praying, and sending. Wherever you are, divide that step into smaller steps. Interview one character. Outline (if you do that) one chapter. Write one paragraph. Then do it again. Put one foot in front of the other until the task is done. (A critique group could help.)

5. Clear the Clutter

Maybe this means clearing your desktop (real world or computer). But, it could also mean going through your idea file and deleting ones that no longer flip your switch. The upside? It might remind you of an idea you’ve wanted to pursue.

4. Recycle

Remember that character you spent so much time developing for Book 3, only to find he didn’t really fit the revised premise? Bring him back in Book 5. Maybe he didn’t fit Book 3 because you wanted him to be a second fiddle when he’s clearly a leading man.

3. Finish

Do you have a novel going, a couple magazine articles, a speaking engagement, and—what was that fourth thing? Oh, right, your spouse’s birthday! Forget multi-tasking. Instead, prioritize and finish one project at a time. When other projects intrude, whip out a sticky-note—write the idea down—and get back on task.

2. Keep Track

Listing what you have accomplished in your writing is a great morale booster. You may not have finished Chapter 8, but you did resolve that hole in your plot in Chapter 6. Keep track, then when you get to the end of the day and feel you’ve accomplished nothing, you’ll know better.

1. Give Yourself Credit

Congratulate—and reward—yourself for what you do accomplish. M&Ms aren’t just for toilet training, you know.

Writing, like spring cleaning, consists of many related tasks. Consistently and conscientiously cleaning out your writing life can be exciting, invigorating, and ultimately, rewarding.

Michael Ehret is the Editor-in-Chief for the Jerry B. Jenkins Christian Writers Guild. He has written for newspapers and other print and online outlets. He edited several nonfiction books, was the senior editor for a faith-based financial services and insurance organization, and is the ezine editor for American Christian Fiction Writers.

Comments

  1. says

    Great tips! My greatest challenge is keeping my work area clean. I have notebooks, sticky notes, note cards and calendars (yes plural. Don’t ask) clogging everything up and often burying useful scenes or phrases with worthless clutter!

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